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    Fugro wins pipe contract at BP's GTA project

Summary

The company will start pipes at the LNG project off Senegal and Mauritania over a six-month period. [image credit: Fugro]

by: Daniel Graeber

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Complimentary, Natural Gas & LNG News, Africa, Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), Corporate, Contracts and tenders, Companies, Europe, BP, Infrastructure, News By Country, Mauritania, Senegal

Fugro wins pipe contract at BP's GTA project

Dutch services company Fugro said October 11 it secured a contract to install more than 190 pipes as part of the construction of an LNG jetty at a major BP project off Senegal and Mauritania.

Fugro will undertake the work over six months beginning in December at BP’s Greater Tortue Ahmeyim (GTA) field, under an award from the project's general contractor, Italy's Saipem. The first phase of the project was sanctioned in late 2018, with a liquefaction capacity of 2.5mn metric tons/year. Production was originally due to start in 2020, but the launch was pushed back to 2023 because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Fugro said its ultra-precise vision technology can “accelerate the project schedule” in touchless-fashion by using geo-data to position the piles.

“The use of vision technology to install the piles for the jetty will improve safety by reducing the need for human intervention and increase overall project efficiency by providing real-time inclination measurements that can be taken without having to pause the piling operations,” the company explained.

The GTA gas field straddles the maritime border between Mauritania and Senegal. It holds an estimated 15 trillion ft3 of natural gas and will position both countries as global LNG export leaders.

“LNG has a clear role in shaping the energy transition and is one of the fastest and most economic paths to lowering carbon emissions,” said Jaco Stemmet, Fugro’s director for African operations.

Fugro did not disclose the contract's value. 

BP leads a consortium developing GTA that also includes Texas-based Kosmos, Senegal's Petrosen and Mauritania's SMPHM.